A Crazy Man Thinks He’s Ernest in Paris

In her third collection, Terry Ann Carter responds to the tragic story of her schizophrenic brother. A Crazy Man Thinks He’s Ernest in Paris is a foray into the world of “voices”, mathematics, hospitals, and art. With sketches of McLean’s Mental Hospital, America’s premier mental hospital, which sheltered John Nash, Sylvia Plath, and Robert Lowell... Read more »

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Rocking on the Edge

We live in edgy times, and Ronnie R. Brown’s newest poetry collection, Rocking on the Edge, looks at every-day people teetering on the brink. Using her trademark style of micro-fictional poetry, Brown chronicles the sad realizations of an exotic dancer who knows she’s “polished that silver pole a little too long,” as well as offering... Read more »

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Tough Times

What sort of country do we want to live in? What sort of country do we already live in? What do we like? Who are we?” With these words, Margaret Atwood frames for us the tough questions that must be asked if we are going to grapple with the hash reality of these economic “tough... Read more »

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Paper Affair

Paper Affair encompasses all the stages of Susan McMaster’s lyrical and engaging “page poetry,” from her first solo collection published in 1986 up to her new poems from 2009, and casts an interesting light on her performance poetry. This new collection from one of our premier poets showcases works of uncommon spirituality, explorations into philosophy and... Read more »

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Generation

After spending much of her teaching career in Ontario, poet Bernice Lever has retired to her native British Columbia where she continues to write. Bernice has worked on several literary magazines, including the award-winning WAVES, which she edited from 1972 – 1987. She also worked for two years in an executive position for the League... Read more »

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Guthrie Road

In The Guthrie Road, Rosemary Sullivan takes a deep look into her Irish roots and the history of the Guthrie/Sullivan family of which she is a proud member. The Guthrie Road is interwoven with the history of Irish immigrants in Montreal. Sullivan paints a vivid picture of the hardships faced by members of her family using old... Read more »

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When Angels Weep

Mary Ann Mulhern‘s When Angels Weep deals with one of the most damaging and controversial issues facing the Roman Catholic Church and the largest settlement for sexual abuse in Canada’s history. The book tells the stories of four victims of the late Father Charles Sylvestre, who was found guilty of 47 counts of sexual abuse... Read more »

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Swimming in the Dark

In this first book, Ross Belot invokes four essential elements: the vastness of the Canadian landscape, the natural world, longing for another and the religious. These elements are used to develop an arc through the five sections of the book that focuses on the theme of self- exploration. <img class=”alignnone” title=”swimming” alt=”” src=”http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51ugo2EU53L._SS500_.jpg” width=”500″ height=”500″... Read more »

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