Guest Blog: Poetry is Essential by Vanessa Shields

Guest Blog: Poetry is Essential by Vanessa Shields The following quotes are taken from Elements of Poetry by Robert Scholes (1968)  “I, too, dislike I it [poetry]: there are things that are important beyond all this fiddle. Reading it, however, with a perfect contempt for it, one discovers in it after all, a place for the genuine”... Read more »

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How I Write: Guest Blog by Bruce Meyer

How I Write: Guest Blog by Bruce Meyer I have heard numerous authors lament that they wished they could bottle inspiration. There are those moments, such as the day Hemingway had in a Spanish hotel, when the ideas flow as if they are rivers of wine (the day he wrote three of his best stories... Read more »

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Guest Blog: Roller Derby is Not Pretty by Kate Hargreaves

An Excerpt from Talking Derby: Stories from a Life on Eight Wheels by Kate Hargreaves (forthcoming) Cheeks flush. Forehead lined with effort. Mascara smeared. Eyes squinting straight ahead. God, my jammer face is not pretty. Anyone who says that roller derby is just a bunch of girls skating in circles looking cute should take one... Read more »

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Tabitha Foundation newsletter features forthcoming Black Moss book

The most recent newsletter from the Tabitha Foundation, a group working on charitable endeavours in Cambodia, featured forthcoming Black Moss book Day Moon Rising by Terry Ann Carter.

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Guest Blog: Where do I Write by John B. Lee

Where Do I Write: the boy who made his own desk One of the questions that students of writing frequently ask me is, “Where do you write?” And I always say, “When I write, I want to be alone in a room, alone in the house, alone on the street, alone in the town, alone... Read more »

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Gumshoe

Wendy Morton’s latest collection of poetry, Gumshoe, follows in the footsteps of her previous works, examining the joy, pain and pitfalls of life as a careful and thorough detective would. “Poets are goofy. They find shadows, take pictures of shoes, wear glitter. Sing” Under the microscope, everyday life in Gumshoe is distilled into lines of... Read more »

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Never a Straight Line

Never A Straight Line tackles a subject that is politically explosive as society grapples with the big question of how generations to come will survive with a world that is only now coming to grips with the slowdestruction of the natural world. Into this mix go the stories of families, of urban development, conservation and waste.... Read more »

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The Gargoyle’s Left Ear: Writing in Ottawa

The Gargoyle’s Left Ear: Writing in Ottawa presents a unique blend of vignettes, reminiscence, and poetry from well known Ottawa writer Susan McMaster. How has this town transformed a shy girl into an outgoing performer and prize-winning poet whose dozenplus books and recordings have been featured across Canada and beyond? “To admit the draw of starlight…” writes... Read more »

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Do Not Call Me By My Name Reviewed by Story Circle

Story Circle Book Reviews recently published a thoughtful review of Lisa Shatzky‘s Do Not Call Me By My Name. Here’s a sample of what reviewer Mary Ann Moore had to say: I couldn’t help but be saddened by the poems and angered too by the residential school system and its long-lasting effects. In “Blackberries” the poet writes: “Even... Read more »

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The Pissing Women of Lafontaine

Though some will blanch and cluck their tongues at the brazen profaning of a more decorous world, these poems keep polite company with all who delight in poetry of quality. The poems in The Pissing Women of Lafontaine have their progenitor in ancient Roman poet Catullus, in 17th century English Poet Laureate John Dryden’s scatalogical masterpiece, “Macflecknoe,”... Read more »

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The Last Labour of the Heart

Aunt Lou had decided to die. The thought had got into her head and there was no getting it out. So said the nurse who called Benjamin Miles from Minneapolis. Lou had stopped eating. Wouldn’t take a bite. She was shed- ding pounds the way a dog sheds fur. She’s skin, bones and sheer determination,... Read more »

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Slow Ascent

Robert Hilles, a Governor General’s Award winning author, narrows his focus to the most intimate connections in his life — his family, friends, memories. He dissects the past making it accessible and familiar to us in this journey that takes him into self-discovery. He studies a picture of his father, and tells us how “haunted” he... Read more »

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There Was a Mr. Cristi

This exciting “literary find,” a never before published novel by the renowned Canadian writer Raymond Knister, tells the story of a woman who tires of living with her “transplanted” husband on his fruit farm outside of Toronto. This ambitious and independent English- born wife leaves for the city with the idea of starting a new... Read more »

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Night Echoes

In the prologue of NIGHT ECHOES a father advises his young daugh- ter that, to truly understand another person, you have to “go to sleep at night in her bed; dream her dreams,” The poems in this collection do just that. Using the voice of an omnicient narrator, Brown enters the dreams of a wide... Read more »

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Riding on a Magpie Riff

“I don’t smoke and I’m no axe murderer,” says Richard Stevenson in his newest book, Riding On A Magpie Riff. This semi-autobiographical work is an endearing and lighthearted rendition of Stevenson’s rise in the literary world, as well as an in-depth exploration of what it means to be an aging artist. Stevenson weaves a complicated tapestry... Read more »

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Wait for Me

Marty Gervais’ Wait For Me is his first book since the selected To Be Now. Robert Hilles, the Governor General’s Award winner says of this work: “These powerful, worldly poems give us piercingly accurate observations on love, life and the spiritual. From playing god with ants, to infidelity, to pigeons in his hotel room, to the price of... Read more »

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God is in the Cracks

In this new book, God Is In The Cracks, Robert Sward combines the mediums of poetry and drama as a series of dialogues between a father and a son. The discourse spans a period of 60 years, illuminating the complex development of a father/son relationship within the multifaceted perspective of a young man who is growing up and... Read more »

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Godspeed

John B. Lee’s collection of poetry in Godspeed, which was an English sailing ship, examines the captivating stories of the seafaring and colo- nial explorers from the 16th century. Lee intertwines his lines of nautical and imperial verse with historical text from such personalities in history as Sir Walter Raleigh, Master George Percy and Sir Francis... Read more »

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Partake – #

In his fourteenth book of poetry, Partake, Governor General’s Award winning poet Robert Hilles writes frankly about the death of his younger brother from cancer. He travels to Chiang Mai in northern Thailand to grieve and heal and through these poems we see East meeting West. Partake chronicles the power of family and the spiritual... Read more »

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