The Gargoyle’s Left Ear: Writing in Ottawa

The Gargoyle’s Left Ear: Writing in Ottawa presents a unique blend of vignettes, reminiscence, and poetry from well known Ottawa writer Susan McMaster. How has this town transformed a shy girl into an outgoing performer and prize-winning poet whose dozenplus books and recordings have been featured across Canada and beyond? “To admit the draw of starlight…” writes... Read more »

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Do Not Call Me By My Name Reviewed by Story Circle

Story Circle Book Reviews recently published a thoughtful review of Lisa Shatzky‘s Do Not Call Me By My Name. Here’s a sample of what reviewer Mary Ann Moore had to say: I couldn’t help but be saddened by the poems and angered too by the residential school system and its long-lasting effects. In “Blackberries” the poet writes: “Even... Read more »

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Calling the Wild

From acclaimed novelist and Governor General’s Award-winning poet Robert Hilles comes a book that’s part memoir, and part lament for the wild. He investigates what we mean by the word today in a world where it is a rapidly depleting commodity. Drawing extensively from his childhood growing up outside Kenora in northwestern Ontario, Hilles takes us back... Read more »

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The Pissing Women of Lafontaine

Though some will blanch and cluck their tongues at the brazen profaning of a more decorous world, these poems keep polite company with all who delight in poetry of quality. The poems in The Pissing Women of Lafontaine have their progenitor in ancient Roman poet Catullus, in 17th century English Poet Laureate John Dryden’s scatalogical masterpiece, “Macflecknoe,”... Read more »

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Far From the Temple of Heaven

Dale Ritterbusch is the author of Lessons Learned, a collection of poems on the Vietnam War and its aftermath. Currently he is Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Department of English & Fine Arts at the United States Air Force Academy. Otherwise he is Professor of Languages and Literatures at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. Of Dale... Read more »

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The Last Labour of the Heart

Aunt Lou had decided to die. The thought had got into her head and there was no getting it out. So said the nurse who called Benjamin Miles from Minneapolis. Lou had stopped eating. Wouldn’t take a bite. She was shed- ding pounds the way a dog sheds fur. She’s skin, bones and sheer determination,... Read more »

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Re:Generations: Canadian Women Poets in Conversation

Reflections on the creative process, the poems, fiction and creative non-fiction in this collection replace the myth of the artist as solitary seer with a different story of lively conversations across generations and among art forms. Slipping into the skin or trying on the voice of an established foremother, or collaborating with a contemporary in... Read more »

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Slow Ascent

Robert Hilles, a Governor General’s Award winning author, narrows his focus to the most intimate connections in his life — his family, friends, memories. He dissects the past making it accessible and familiar to us in this journey that takes him into self-discovery. He studies a picture of his father, and tells us how “haunted” he... Read more »

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There Was a Mr. Cristi

This exciting “literary find,” a never before published novel by the renowned Canadian writer Raymond Knister, tells the story of a woman who tires of living with her “transplanted” husband on his fruit farm outside of Toronto. This ambitious and independent English- born wife leaves for the city with the idea of starting a new... Read more »

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Night Echoes

In the prologue of NIGHT ECHOES a father advises his young daugh- ter that, to truly understand another person, you have to “go to sleep at night in her bed; dream her dreams,” The poems in this collection do just that. Using the voice of an omnicient narrator, Brown enters the dreams of a wide... Read more »

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Riding on a Magpie Riff

“I don’t smoke and I’m no axe murderer,” says Richard Stevenson in his newest book, Riding On A Magpie Riff. This semi-autobiographical work is an endearing and lighthearted rendition of Stevenson’s rise in the literary world, as well as an in-depth exploration of what it means to be an aging artist. Stevenson weaves a complicated tapestry... Read more »

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Wait for Me

Marty Gervais’ Wait For Me is his first book since the selected To Be Now. Robert Hilles, the Governor General’s Award winner says of this work: “These powerful, worldly poems give us piercingly accurate observations on love, life and the spiritual. From playing god with ants, to infidelity, to pigeons in his hotel room, to the price of... Read more »

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The Life of the Four Stomachs

Marilyn Gear Pilling’s latest collection, The Life of the Four Stomachs, is an ingeniously humourous yet passionate look at “the glorious mess of life/the guts the mud the smite the blood the song the sob/of life.” Through tales of sensuality, heartbreak, and laughter, the writer, the lover, the daughter, and the friend emerge and fuse together... Read more »

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Beyond All Reason

Emmanuelle Vivier, a Paris-born translator and poet, has written a book of poems that charts the course of a disillusioned woman who starts an affair that leads to the beginning of a life of self-discovery. This is the third title in the First Lines series done by Black Moss Press. The series puts into print... Read more »

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God is in the Cracks

In this new book, God Is In The Cracks, Robert Sward combines the mediums of poetry and drama as a series of dialogues between a father and a son. The discourse spans a period of 60 years, illuminating the complex development of a father/son relationship within the multifaceted perspective of a young man who is growing up and... Read more »

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Godspeed

John B. Lee’s collection of poetry in Godspeed, which was an English sailing ship, examines the captivating stories of the seafaring and colo- nial explorers from the 16th century. Lee intertwines his lines of nautical and imperial verse with historical text from such personalities in history as Sir Walter Raleigh, Master George Percy and Sir Francis... Read more »

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Dimensions of an Orchard

The best laid plans of mice and men, women and gods… Dave Margoshes lays out these plans with a deft poetic hand, turning them inside out, peering underneath, holding them up to his ear.

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Partake – #

In his fourteenth book of poetry, Partake, Governor General’s Award winning poet Robert Hilles writes frankly about the death of his younger brother from cancer. He travels to Chiang Mai in northern Thailand to grieve and heal and through these poems we see East meeting West. Partake chronicles the power of family and the spiritual... Read more »

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A Crazy Man Thinks He’s Ernest in Paris

In her third collection, Terry Ann Carter responds to the tragic story of her schizophrenic brother. A Crazy Man Thinks He’s Ernest in Paris is a foray into the world of “voices”, mathematics, hospitals, and art. With sketches of McLean’s Mental Hospital, America’s premier mental hospital, which sheltered John Nash, Sylvia Plath, and Robert Lowell... Read more »

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Rocking on the Edge

We live in edgy times, and Ronnie R. Brown’s newest poetry collection, Rocking on the Edge, looks at every-day people teetering on the brink. Using her trademark style of micro-fictional poetry, Brown chronicles the sad realizations of an exotic dancer who knows she’s “polished that silver pole a little too long,” as well as offering... Read more »

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